MIRANDA MOSS / AFRICANAH | Flat base decoded
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MIRANDA MOSS / AFRICANAH

 

Something has gone askew in the fundamental order of things.

We attempted to fix it, but stuff is stubbornly elusive in nature. We tried preserving the environment, but ran out of sodium benzoate halfway through. All romantic clich├ęs were prohibited, yet the sunsets persist. Any remaining holes in the Ozone were filled with bubblegum-flavoured bubblegum. We prescribed a smorgasbord of ADHD meds, anti-anxiety pills and calamine lotions, but the fields grow restless still. The Mountain DewTM sprinkler systems only cultivated a rise in weed obesity levels while, despite the instalment of thousands of swimming pools, the deserts are as impoverished and thirsty as ever. We ensured all our free-range organic oceans were bottled at the sourcewith approved levels of iodine, fluorine and fluoxitine. We even invented an instrument to measure Spring with. Maybe gravity got up on the wrong side of the bed this morning. Maybe the tides just need to be turned off and on again.

They say that perhaps tomorrow, it will be fine.
(Weather permitting, that is)


Toying with the representation of Nature as a pure and extra-cultural phenomenon, 'The Nature of Stuff and Things' positions environments as deeply embedded in systems of interaction and exchange. Landscape, an idea inseparable from convention, is used as a medium to explore how personal, economic and visual value structures are projected onto the exterior world.

The “things” hail from an imaginary terrain, where anomalies are the status quo and matter mischievously imitates its observers’ personal quirks and desires; a mirage replete with existential predicaments and riddled with logical fallacies. Through techno-alchemical dabbling, familiar objects are subjected to extraordinary situations, while synthetic by-products are released back into the wild for the first time. Swayed by a process of post-natural selection, real and imagined associations of the land are superimposed, disrupting any essential purity which may be anticipated.



The products of this anxious arcadia are self-awarely escapist and ascribe to a kind of cynical optimism. They re-imagine natural phenomena yet the translation process is muddled, resulting in perplexing incidents and curious interactions; a misunderstood utopia. This process grasps at (and appears to tame) its subject, but has the quixotic efficiency of catching mist in a butterfly net.


Researcher: Brandon Spark
Source: Art Throb
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